Friday, March 23, 2012

Understanding Apertures: Lesson 4

First, set your camera mode to Av (Aperture Value) so that you can take control of the aperture rather than letting the camera make your creative decisions.

A Definition: 

Your camera lens' aperture = an adjustable opening in the camera that limits the amount of light passing through a lens

A large aperture number such as f/16 or f/22 = a large part of the scene in focus (a large depth of field)
A large aperture number lets in less light.

A small aperture number like f/2.8 or f/4 = a small part or small slice of the scene in focus (a small depth of field)
A small aperture number lets in more light. Pick a smaller aperture number when you are inside or when it is dark. By picking a small number, you will let in more light and be able to take better pictures in dim lighting conditions.
A small aperture number is a way to simplify or isolate your subject.

“If you get confused with the f-stop numbers, try to remember that the bigger the number, the bigger the amount of focus, and the smaller the number, the smaller the amount of focus.”
 – Mike Moats

Do you want everything sharp and filled with detail - from the foreground to the background? 
Pick a big aperture number like I did in the picture below.


Is the background of your picture "busy" or cluttered, meaning that it has lots of distracting elements?
Choose a small aperture number for a small depth of field (a small amount of the picture sharp) 
to focus attention on the subject.
This photo was made using a small aperture number.

Choose where people's eyes will go in the picture by using a small aperture number. 
What is the focus of the image?
Here I chose to focus on the hot sauce bottle and let the boy go out of focus. 

How to choose which aperture to use:


  • What are you trying to convey?
  • Does the background add to the picture or does it detract from the subject?

Assignment:


Find 3 different scenes or subjects. For each one, take a picture at your camera's smallest aperture number, biggest aperture number, and middle aperture number. Study the differences between the pictures in each set.
Not seeing much difference? Set the camera's smallest aperture number and focus on an object very close to your camera lens. Take a picture. Now, set the camera to the highest aperture number. Keep the camera in the same place and keep the focus on the same object. Take a second picture.


"Repeat shooting the same images at different apertures each time you go out. Little by little, you will become comfortable at the different f-stops and be able to recognize and take advantage of opportunities that are better suited to one style or the other.” – Alan L. Detrick



"Offer unto God thanksgiving; and pay thy vows unto the most High: And call upon me in the day of trouble: I will deliver thee, and thou shalt glorify me."
Psalm 50:14-15



2 comments:

  1. This is SO cool Laura!
    I've been wanting to take photography classes,
    But this is a way better option!
    'sides, It's free!
    I Like how you give picture examples.
    I'll be sure to refer your blog to some of my friends!

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  2. Thanks Kaylee!
    It's great to hear from you!
    I'm so glad you like it! I've been wanting to teach for quite a while and now I've finally gotten around to putting some of my thoughts into words!
    Thanks for following!
    I'd love to meet your friends!

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