Monday, October 22, 2012

Critiques and Judging a Contest

Entering contests is a great way to receive feedback on your work and progress quickly in your photography. Here's a link for you to check out ~ it's from a contest I was invited to judge.
http://www.godsworldphotography.com/and-the-winners-are

Enjoy!
Laura Christine


Friday, October 5, 2012

Lesson 10 – Flattering Portraits


A while back, I was doing a one-on-one photography outing at my place with Nela, another photographer I had met. One of the topics for the evening was, "What camera lenses should be used to create beautiful, flattering portraits of my friends, family, and clients?" I thought I'd share a recap for ya'll to enjoy!

The difference between the right lens and the wrong one is dramatic. (I didn't do any photo editing on these other than to re-size and sharpen them for web use.) The boy didn't move at all. Doesn't the one on the left look like he has his neck stuck out?


The picture on the left was taken with a 17-55mm lens. (That's the type of lens that likely came with your camera if you have an SLR - your “kit” lens.) It’s a great lens for certain things, but NOT the right one to choose when you want to impress someone by taking a great picture of him or her. This lens will distort people’s faces terribly, especially if you don’t zoom in at all! Did you ever wonder why you are hardly ever happy with the way you look in photos? The camera lens’ focal length plays a big part in that. Nobody likes to look worse than they do in real life.

The photo on the right is taken with a 70-200mm lens, zoomed in to 200mm. This is the way the boy looks in real life. All I did was to change my lens, take several steps backward, and zoom in. The boy didn't move at all


What is "focal length"?

"The focal length of a lens determines how much magnification it provides. A lens with a shorter focal length will be able to 'see' a wider view of a subject than can a lens with a longer focal length, which would see a narrower view of the scene, but at a higher level of magnification.”
– Definition from mobileburn glossary
The smaller the number on the lens (e.g. 18-55mm), the wider the view seen in the camera. The larger the number printed on the lens (e.g. 70-200mm), the more things are magnified.

The good photo of the boy that I showed you earlier was taken with a 70-200mm lens. (It was one of those bigger, longer lenses.) You can easily see the difference between the good image and the distorted one.
Note: I mention the 17-55mm lens, the 18-55mm lens, and the 70-200mm lens, but you could substitute your 55-250mm lens or 70-300mm lens, etc. for the 70-200mm lens I have.

Q: Why did the wide angle lens – the 17-55mm lens – distort the boy’s face?
A: All wide-angle lenses distort straight lines: they make straight lines look curved. Look at these examples I took of a grid. See how the one on the left taken with the wide 17-55mm lens skews the lines? The photo on the right was taken with the 70-200mm and has much less distortion. Look at how much straighter the lines are.


If you have a small camera – a point-and-shoot – instead of an SLR, you can still benefit from this advice. When you’re taking a picture of a friend, step back and zoom in on your subject’s face instead of standing really close to her to take the photo. She will thank you when she sees the result and you will have a MUCH nicer picture to show for your trouble. Try it and see! It makes an AMAZING difference. 

Q: Are there times to use a wide-angle lens for portraits?
A: Yes, and we’ll talk about those times later – you can do some exciting stuff with wide-angle lenses! They aren't made for gorgeous close-up portrait photography though.

So.. there you have it! Step back and zoom in to get the best results!
Speaking of results, here are some of the photos I came away with after the photography outing.
Nela and I shared a wonderful evening together shooting photos to our heart’s content…well, not really. I only had about a million other places to show her and a hundred other techniques to talk about! It was fun. J All of these photos were shot with my 70-200mm lens.


We had a great time together.




Backlighting is fun and gorgeous...and so is long grass!






Lots of laughs.
Lots of photos.
Lots of fun.


"Surely I come quickly. 
Amen. 
Even so, come, Lord Jesus."
Revelation 22:20b