Thursday, November 15, 2012

Food Photography – Lesson 11


With all the wonderful holidays coming up, who doesn't want to take great pictures to remember all the delicious foods they took so long to prepare! This lesson will help you capture how truly YUMMY all the food was - and make others envious they weren't there to share it with you!

Food photography is both fun and challenging. After all, if people don’t get hungry after seeing your photos, it’s back to the drawing board again. When I take pictures of food, I want it to seem so real that you can almost reach out and take a bite! Think about all the great advertisements for food. A larger-than-life hamburger, dripping with Ketchup, might be pictured. Make people want to eat what’s in your photos! …How is this done? In this lesson, I’ll share several tips with you. Try them and see if your food photography doesn’t look good enough to eat!


1. Put camera on tripod. I know, I know. It takes extra time and bother, but if you want great food pictures, this is one of the easiest ways to learn what looks best. By attaching the camera to a tripod, you will be able to run back and forth from the camera to the food without losing your “perfect angle”. This way, you can arrange food according to what you actually see through the camera lens.

2. If certain foods don’t stand out enough in the image, prop them up. Flat foods especially benefit from this.

3. We eat with our eyes first. Everyone has heard this at some time or other. If all the food on the plate is a shade of tan or brown, the likelihood is that it won’t look very appealing! So, use different colors and textures and make them complimentary. Try tying things together with a coordinating napkin and table cloth. A good eye for colors comes in handy here. Use other props too! Create scenes where food is the star.

4. Get the white balance right. Oreos with a dirty, yellowish filling don’t look appetizing! One tip here is, “Don’t use a lamp, the room lights, and a window to light your food unless you’re going for a special effect.” Doing this will lead to pictures with orange or blue color casts and unrealistic-looking, off-color food photos.



5. Don’t underexpose the food! Too-dark shots can’t compete with bright, well-lit scenes. Use exposure compensation to your advantage!

6. On-camera flash usually spoils the shot. The best lighting for food often comes from the sides and back.

7. Once you've “gotten the shot” don’t stop! Experiment with different angles…above, down low, up close, even underneath for some foods! Try getting some macro shots and then go for the full picture.

8. Add some action!


9. Some food benefits greatly from a “this is fresh” look. Spray water droplets onto this kind of food. If you need more time to take the picture and the water droplets won’t last long enough, try spraying food with olive oil cooking spray.

10. Experiment with different apertures to focus attention on a certain part of the image.


11. Don’t show ugly food. If there’s a little problem spot, try covering it with a complementary garnish such as cracked pepper, herbs, berries, green onions, sliced peppers, lemons, limes, mushrooms, and fruit. Don’t just stick it on. Be creative with the garnish cutting and arranging. Make it complementary. For dry meat, brush on a bit of dark Karo syrup. It’ll help add moisture and color. Don’t show fatty meat (Ugh!) or under-cooked or overcooked meat. If you wouldn't want to eat it, it won’t be a good subject!

12. In soups or stews, people want to see all the wonderful bits and pieces. The problem is, these chunks of food will sink down into the bottom of the dish and not show in the picture. The remedy: add a false bottom in the soup bowl to prop up the yummy chunks.

Have fun!




P.S. Remember to get a picture of the family around the table before everyone digs in, the table gets messy, the wonderful food creations are devoured, and everyone stuffs themselves to bursting.


"As ye have therefore received Christ Jesus the Lord, so walk ye in him: Rooted and built up in him, and stablished in the faith, as ye have been taught, abounding therein 
with thanksgiving."
Colossians 2:6-7